Week 11: Savannah, Georgia

We drove 125 miles south from Charleston to the Skidaway Island State Park just south of Savannah. After you enter the park there is a 3.5 mile drive under an arch of live oaks dripping with Spanish moss. It looked like the motorhome was too high to make it under the canopy, but it wasn’t. The trees are trimmed to allow a clearnace of 14 feet. We need 12 feet in order not to scrap the top. It was a  beautiful drive. This was another park where they let you drive through and find your own spot, hang your receipt and park it. Hiking trails in the park take you through marshes, live oaks, cabbage palmettos and pines. It rained for two days and of course, 100% humidity. I don’t have to use moisturizer here. It’s like living in a rain forest! Quite a change from home.

Three and a half mile tree lined drive into the campground

Three and a half mile tree lined drive into the campground

My morning walk was through the swampland looking for alligators and then it opened  to the savannahs. Each morning walk is different. I love it! And it was National Sandwich Day and Subway had two for one on sandwiches. We took advantage of that!

The savannah

The savannah

I went into Savannah for the day and visited:

Jepson Center (art museum)

Owens-Thomas House (house built in 1819 designed by William Jay of Bath, England)

Owens-Thompson House

Owens-Thompson House

Telfair Academy (historic house with a museum)

Forsyth Park (large city park in the historic district with a beautiful fountain)

Forsyth Park Fountain

Forsyth Park Fountain

Colonial Park Cemetery (burying ground from 1750 -1853, became a park in 1896)

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Most of the city squares (Savannah was founded in 1722 by James Oglethorpe and he laid out the city with many squares that were intended to provide colonists space for military exercises. Now they are beautiful parks in the city)

George Washington Statue

George Washington Statue

Leopold’s Ice Cream (best ice cream in the area)

Jones Street (historic street with houses occupied by the well-to-do; where the phrase “keeping up with the Jones” originated)

Jones Street - Keeping up with the Jones

Jones Street – Keeping up with the Jones


Steps covered in vines

Steps covered in vines


Wrought Iron Work

Wrought Iron Work

River Street (the area along the Savannah Front River)

River Street

River Street


Memorial for Mariners

Memorial for Mariners

Cathedral of St John the Baptist Catholic Church (built from 1873 – 1896)

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Alligator Soul (great place for dinner)

Bonaventure Cemetery

We toured this very old cemetery made famous by the book and movie “Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil.”  In 1867 John Muir began his Thousand Mile Walk to Florida and the Gulf.  In October he sojourned for six days and nights in the Bonaventure cemetery, sleeping upon graves overnight, this being the safest and cheapest accommodation that he could find while he waited for money to be expressed from home. It has several notable burials including Johnny Mercer (co-founder of Capital Records and composer), Edythe Chapman (silent film actress), James Neil (actor).  It is an erringly beautiful cemetery.

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Fort Pulaski

Fort Pulaski is a Third System of coastal fortifications developed during the first half of the 19th century and is characterized by greater structural durability than earlier forts. Nearly all of the 30+ Third System forts built after 1816 still exist. We visited a few of those forts. Fort Pulaski and Fort Clinch are two of the best preserved.

However well-built Fort Pulaski was the quick fall of it during the Civil War surprised and shocked the world. Fort Pulaski was considered the “most spectacular harbor defense structures in the United States.” Many considered the 7.5 foot solid brick walls with massive masonry piers unbreachable. All previous military experience had taught that beyond 700 yards smoothbore cannons and mortars would have little chance to break through heavy masonry walls, beyond 1,000 yards no chance at all. With the nearest Union battery on Tybee Island, more than one mile away, Fort Pulaski felt secure. What they didn’t know was that the Union had developed “rifled guns/cannons” which were more accurate and could go longer distances. After one battle that damaged part of the fort, Col Charles Olmstead surrendered. Bad for him, good for us. The fort is completely intact and can be toured. Very interesting place for both Ralph and I.

Fort Pulaski

Fort Pulaski


Fort Pulaski

Fort Pulaski


Fort Pulaski preparations for Veteran's Day

Fort Pulaski preparations for Veteran’s Day

The next day Ralph and I toured Pin Point, the home of Clarence Thomas, Supreme Court Justice (don’t get me started on this guy) and an historic shrimp and oyster factory. Pin Point is a rural settlement founded by freed slaves after the American Civil War. It is predominantly African American with a group of Gullah speakers. The historic creole language of the Low Country was drawn from West African languages. Most residents of Pin Point worked in the shrimp and oyster “factory” in the area. We toured the little factory and museum. It was a very interesting stop.

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Wormsloe State Historic Site is colonial estate founded in 1736 by an early colonist, Noble Jones (1702-1775). There is a ruin of his first tabby construction house. The house took six years to build and required mixing more than 8,000 bushels each of lime, sand, oyster shells and water to make tabby. Large shell middens left behind by Native Americans were mined for oyster shells, some of which were heated in kilns to produce lime-rich ash. The wet tabby was poured into wooden molds to dry and then the mold was removed and moved up the wall, ready to take more tabby. Tabby provides a very strong and long lasting building material, as evidenced by the ruin left today. Unfortunately I cannot find the photos from Wormsloe.

I LOVED Savannah and will certainly return sometime in the future.

Next stop Amelia Island, Florida.

 

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